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Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Say on Pay Just Says No to Citigroup, BofA Loses by Winning, and the Risky World of Derivatives

DOW – 68 = 12,964SPX – 8 = 1376NAS – 23 = 300710 YR YLD -.03 = 1.95%OIL -.01 = 102.66GOLD +.60 = 1643.60SILV + .17 = 31.90PLAT + 3.00 = 1587.00 Vikram Pandit, the CEO of Citigroup was “this close” to a $15 million dollar payday. And then shareholders slammed on the brakes and demanded the amount be toned down. It might be a trend. Wells Fargo and Bank of America will ask shareholders to vote on executive pay in coming weeks, and the results at Citi might influence the voting at Wells and BofA. Yesterday, shareholders rejected the compensation plan of regional bank FirstMerit Corp., of Akron, Ohio. The bank gave its CEO a pay raise to $6.4 million last year from $5.5 million, while its stock fell 20 percent. “Say-on-Pay” votes by shareholders were a requirement of the Dodd-Frank financial reform Act, and it looks like 90% of the compensation packages are winning approval, but the margin is slim. The Occupy movement plans to protest at 36 shareholder meetings this spring and the investment community seems to be waking up from a long nap of disengagement. The California Public Employees Retirement System, or CalPERS, voted no on the Citigroup pay measure because Citi “has not anchored rewards to performance.” Unfortunately, the only reason CalPERS voted against the pay package was because Pandit’s performance was beyond incompetent. What is the appropriate role for CalPERS? Shouldn’t they stand up for their members? Chief executives at some of the nation’s …

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March, Tuesday 13, 2012

DOW + 217 = 13,177SPX + 24 = 1395NAS + 56 = 303910 YR YLD + .08 = 2.11%OIL +.04 = 106.75GOLD – 25.70 = 1676.10 SILV – .20 = 33.51PLAT – 7.00 = 1692.00 It’s a crazy world. Stocks posted their best day of the year. Go figure. The big boost seems to be JPMorgan announcing a dividend, while at the same time 3 banks failed the Fed’s Stress Test. Wait a minute, you’re asking yourself, “Self, am I going crazy or was the Fed supposed to release the results of the Stress Test on Thursday?” And of course, the answer is yes. The Fed, in releasing its annual stress test results, said 15 of the 19 largest banks would have satisfactory capital buffers, even after considering banks’ proposed dividend increases or share buybacks. The regulator said Citigroup, Ally Financial, SunTrust, and MetLife fared worst under the supervisory stress ratios, with Tier 1 common capital ratios of 4.9 percent, 2.5 percent, 4.8%, and 5.1 percent, respectively. The bank holding companies that came out top were Bank of New York Mellon with a Tier 1 common capital ratio of 13.1 percent under the hypothetical financial shock, State Street Corp with 12.5 percent and American Express with 10.8 percent. Bank of America came in with 6.2 percent, and JPMorgan’s result was 5.4 percent. So, only 4 out of 19 enormous financial institutions failed the stress test, meaning that just over one-quarter of the biggest banks in the country could implode at …

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